Tag Archives: visible

Visible: Adaptation

22 Apr

An adaptation of The Giving Tree in terms of visibility will be easy to achieve. Although there is not much to be seen on the pages of the book in terms of text or extremely detailed images, the imagination works to fill in these gaps. Seger’s recommendation is to keep the story simple when adapting, and this book is no challenge in terms of simplicity. The movement of the story arcs and specific dialogue of the characters allow for a great sense of visibility in the mind of the reader. In an adaptation, however, more background information will need to be filled in as an explicit demonstration of the beginnings of the boy and tree’s relationship. Because a book allows for the mind of the reader to wander, there is no explanation needed. However, in terms of a blox or short film, a visual foundation is required for the audience to understand the significance of their interaction.

According to Seger, the stories that are the most realistic are those that are most easily adaptable- or in this case easily visible. Because we can relate to the boy and his playful actions as a child, his experiences as a teenager, and his desires for a house and a family, we not only can relate, but can visualize the way these paths of his life would go over the course of a film. We can envision the conversations, the dates he goes on, the construction of his house and the development of his family, all because we relate as human beings. For these reasons, an adaptation would not be much of a challenge in the way of story development, it would just be a matter of translating the ideas of whoever is directing, to match and be approved by those who may also be working on this project of adaptation.

Visible: Experience

22 Apr

So much of  The Giving Tree  is experienced through the quality of being visible. However, there is much to the story that is not explicitly visible because of lack of color or extreme detail in the drawings or even detail in the text. The visibility of this work is provided through the work of the imagination. As an experience, the visibility of The Giving Tree is such that the mind creates the forest as the environment in which the boy and tree’s relationship is kindled and therefore allows for a sense of happiness and adventure because of the mind’s freedom to go where it pleases.

Personally, when reading the story, I fill in the gaps, imagining other trees in the forest, a blue sky, bright sunshine. I imagine the boy shimmying up the tree rustling the branches, ruling the forest as a boy with such a wide open imagination. I imagine his life when he is away, at home with his family, spending time with his girlfriend under the tree. I imagine the boy carving the initials into the tree as a young boy, and again as an adolescent with the initials of his love. I imagine the boy growing older as a man, marrying his love from younger years, making a life with her. He needs a house so we see him return to the tree and ask for some wood. The tree of course gives him the wood and as the image on the page shows the boy, now older, walking away with the wood, one imagines him cutting this wood and building a house.

This story is so beautifully written that I would describe this experience of reading as imaginative and emotional. The visibility that the imagination provides is quite pleasurable and one that is most definitely unique to this work of literature.

Analogy

28 Feb

The analogy I chose to explain Visibility is the sense of relief felt when the airplane breaks through the clouds on decent and the ground is visible again after a flight.

 

When riding on an airplane, even though the length and relative smoothness of the ride almost allows passengers to forget that they are thousands of feet in the air, it is almost inevitable that upon descent a great sense of relief is felt when the plane breaks through the clouds and the ground is visible. In my mind, the Visibility of the ground is one of the greatest senses of relief, especially for those who have a fear of heights. Visibility in this sense provides a feeling of safety and comfort. It is something familiar and therefore welcoming.

This analogy not only represents Visibility in the literal sense because of the ability to see the ground, but also represents excitement in the span of colors that is newly visible, different from the vastness of blue, white or black that are the sole colors in sight when flying. I have previously mentioned that I feel as though Visibility can be equated in a way with excitement or stimulation and because of this, I feel the excitement of knowing that one is close to their destination and close to the ground for others is attributed to this Visibility of the ground.

Analogy

24 Feb

The analogy I am using to represent Lightness is of free-falling on an amusement park ride such as the Tower of Terror at Disney’s Hollywood Studios or Doctor Doom’s Fear Fall at Universal’s Islands of Adventure.

I feel as though free-falling is comparable to the work of E-Lit that I have chosen for Lightness because they both imply or provide explicitly a sense of weightlessness and discomfort. The weightlessness in the E-Lit work, “in the white darkness” is found from the transparency of the overlay that is layered on top of the actual image. There is a white mask on top of the picture beneath, but the picture is not clearly visible because of the opacity of the white layer and the blurred effect that it creates. This white layer, although evoking a sense of haze, also evokes a sense of weightlessness because it acts as a veil and we understand aesthetically the purpose of a veil and know that it is not of great weight. Free falling also provides a sense of weightlessness because of the physics involved in such an amusement. Typically these types of rides take the rider to the top of the tower or structure at a rather fast speed, therefore pressing the rider into the seat in which they are strapped. When they reach the top, the hydraulic system is released and the vehicle is released so that the passengers are for a moment suspended in the air, weightless.

I have also mentioned that both the E-Lit work and the act of free-falling provide an experience of discomfort. There is discomfort in experiencing the E-Lit work because of the inability to clearly see what is beneath the layer of whiteness. As discussed in the Graphics section, humans’ natural inclination is to feel a sense of discomfort or anxiety when we know that something is there that we cannot see or understand. The free fall also provides discomfort or anxiety to those experiencing the sensation of weightlessness because of the adrenaline that our bodies release in response to being in an atypical situation. Not only do we experience physiological discomfort, but some people have genuine fears of heights or falling and therefore also experience a great emotional response that elicits screaming and sometimes crying to release their feelings of discomfort and anxiety.