Tag Archives: boy

Visible: Adaptation

22 Apr

An adaptation of The Giving Tree in terms of visibility will be easy to achieve. Although there is not much to be seen on the pages of the book in terms of text or extremely detailed images, the imagination works to fill in these gaps. Seger’s recommendation is to keep the story simple when adapting, and this book is no challenge in terms of simplicity. The movement of the story arcs and specific dialogue of the characters allow for a great sense of visibility in the mind of the reader. In an adaptation, however, more background information will need to be filled in as an explicit demonstration of the beginnings of the boy and tree’s relationship. Because a book allows for the mind of the reader to wander, there is no explanation needed. However, in terms of a blox or short film, a visual foundation is required for the audience to understand the significance of their interaction.

According to Seger, the stories that are the most realistic are those that are most easily adaptable- or in this case easily visible. Because we can relate to the boy and his playful actions as a child, his experiences as a teenager, and his desires for a house and a family, we not only can relate, but can visualize the way these paths of his life would go over the course of a film. We can envision the conversations, the dates he goes on, the construction of his house and the development of his family, all because we relate as human beings. For these reasons, an adaptation would not be much of a challenge in the way of story development, it would just be a matter of translating the ideas of whoever is directing, to match and be approved by those who may also be working on this project of adaptation.

Visible: Experience

22 Apr

So much of  The Giving Tree  is experienced through the quality of being visible. However, there is much to the story that is not explicitly visible because of lack of color or extreme detail in the drawings or even detail in the text. The visibility of this work is provided through the work of the imagination. As an experience, the visibility of The Giving Tree is such that the mind creates the forest as the environment in which the boy and tree’s relationship is kindled and therefore allows for a sense of happiness and adventure because of the mind’s freedom to go where it pleases.

Personally, when reading the story, I fill in the gaps, imagining other trees in the forest, a blue sky, bright sunshine. I imagine the boy shimmying up the tree rustling the branches, ruling the forest as a boy with such a wide open imagination. I imagine his life when he is away, at home with his family, spending time with his girlfriend under the tree. I imagine the boy carving the initials into the tree as a young boy, and again as an adolescent with the initials of his love. I imagine the boy growing older as a man, marrying his love from younger years, making a life with her. He needs a house so we see him return to the tree and ask for some wood. The tree of course gives him the wood and as the image on the page shows the boy, now older, walking away with the wood, one imagines him cutting this wood and building a house.

This story is so beautifully written that I would describe this experience of reading as imaginative and emotional. The visibility that the imagination provides is quite pleasurable and one that is most definitely unique to this work of literature.

Quick: Cornell

22 Apr

My experience of Cornell in terms of being quick will be reflected in my blox as things that represent time, the passage of time, and other things that are relative to brevity.

Going along with my first aesthetic, I will include a clock, and this will be the basis for the content of my blox, for time is the basis of all being and the means with which we measure our lives. I will also include a picture of an old click camera. These cameras capture pictures with the press of a button and capture a moment in time that we would like to preserve. The instantaneousness with which these cameras function is an example of the speed with which this story passes, as well as the memories upon which the tree reflects in her time without her friend.

Also included in my blox to represent quickness I will include water. Water has the ability to travel at high speeds because of its liquid form and as a child I spend a great deal of time playing outside in the water- in sprinklers, the pool, lakes and streams in the mountains. As the boy has memories with the tree that come to him in an instant of quickness, so do I have these memories that are related to my experiences playing outside in the water. Finally, I will include a swing in my blox to represent quickness. Just like the boy who swung from the trees branches, I swung on the swings of the numerous playgrounds I played on as a child. This was one of my favorite past times because I felt free and felt as though I was flying like a bird high in the sky. Swinging was truly a magical experience for me as a child and I have a great deal of memories spending my time soaring back and forth, using my imagination to take me away to make-believe places, just like the boy.

Quick: Experience

22 Apr

Not only is The Giving Tree light and exact, but it represents the quality of being quick very well. There is no delay or hesitation to the story, no drawn out sequences of action that keep the reader from experiencing the true movement of the story in reasonable time. The book is  a concise, exact and quick read. This is another quality in which synchronicity is demonstrated. Although there are only a short 25 pages, most with only one line, the story spans the entire life of the boy in close to three minutes- if read leisurely. The reader is seemingly deprived of details of the in-between times of the boy’s life, however, I choose to see the gaps in story or the brevity of the content as an opportunity for the imagination. The mind must act quickly if it is to fill in the gaps between pages, as each sheet represents a number of years passing between one’s fingers.

This is the kind of book that is over quickly and that one wants to read again, but the feelings caused by reading this story remain for such a period that the soul and emotional palette need a time for recovery and to process what just happened in such a short amount of time. My personal experience with The Giving Tree in terms of quickness is such that it has forced me to think about the speed with which life passes us by. In so many ways, our lives are long and take thousands of days to pass us by. However, all those of older age express to the younger generations the speed with which time flies and the way one wakes up one day and realizes the majority of their life is behind them. In reading this story, it can be understood that the boy’s life seems to pass him by a great deal faster than does that of the trees. The tree endures a life of waiting for her friend to return and enjoy her happiness which in turn provides the tree with happiness. It does not require a great deal of time to understand that this is the basis for their relationship, and this brevity or quickness is a huge contributing factor to the success of this story- such power and emotion evoked with the definition of conciseness.

Quick: Adaptation

22 Apr

My adaptation of The Giving Tree in terms of being quick is centered around the brevity of the story. Because of the few number of pages and the quick read, an adaptation into a film would require that it be a short film. Although the meanings of this story run much deeper than what is on the surface and could allow for a greater expansion, the emotional impact and theme of the story has the chance of being spread too thin and therefore losing its value if extended too long.

In terms of Seger and her tips for adaptation, there is one character in The Giving Tree that embodies the main essence of the story and that is the tree. She is the central focus and is in every scene or on every page of the book. Although she is the dominant character, she is not the narrator. This story requires a narrator that is removed from the story. That person is omniscient- they know all of the story, the feelings of both the characters and the whys of these feelings. This narrator is also a reason for the story’s brevity. They waste no time in getting to the main points of action in the story- even if that means bypassing  a number of years. In this way, the narrator is almost an unseen character. Their presence is known because of the boy and tree’s mentionings in third person, but no unnecessary attention is drawn to the narrator. If the story was too long, the purpose of the narrator would become less obvious because the story could at that point explain itself. The more brief the story, the greater need for a narrator, and in this case the length is just right for the maximum emotional impact and the narrator is just enough involved to convey the true thoughts and feelings while not distracting from the essence of the themes.

Multiple: Cornell

22 Apr

For my “multiple” blox to represent a similar work of art as Cornell made, I will include a number of things that are repetitive to represent the nature of The Giving Tree and that spark personal memories to which I can relate. Cornell’s process was such that he drew on memories and personal experiences to create his art. The things I have chosen are also relative to emotions that I associate with the feeling of multiplicity and the feelings I gathered from this quality in the book.

As a result of the emphasis that the multiplicity creates, and the warm feeling I have from the story, I have chosen to include a picture of the sun to represent warmth. However, while this is a good story about a boy and his relationship and the happiness they share together, it is also an emotional story that displays the true sadness of someone who gives unconditionally and doesn’t receive much in return. This, therefore also creates a sense of sadness. This juxtaposition of emotions and synchronicity is why I will also include images of rain so as to imply the sadness that the tree and audience both feel. Both the sun and the rain are available and come in abundant forms- in multiples even- and therefore are appropriate for this application. I will also include apples because of their abundance when the boy collects them from the tree to sell for a profit. As a similar item to which I can relate from my childhood that I sold in great number, like many children, is lemonade. Finally, the inclusion of Easter eggs is one last element that represents a childhood memory of something coming in the form of multiples. Easter eggs are a symbol of happiness that the adults typically hide for the children to find. The more eggs, the more chance of being rewarded a greater number of times and the more exciting the game.

I feel as though all of these items are worthy of enlistment as they are a part of my memory bank from childhood, as many of Cornell’s are as well.

Multiple: Experience

21 Apr

Calvino describes multiplicity as a quality that involves explaining until something cannot be explained any more- until a new topic is reached by the over explanation of an original topic. However, The Giving Tree, in its 25 pages, is not an example of this. It demonstrates a different kind of multiplicity, and that is the repetition of certain elements of the story.

I found this experience of repetition or multiplication to be endearing, especially since at its core, The Giving Tree is a children’s book. This is not only easy for the children to understand, but from an adult perspective provides a sense of enforced meaning and a deeper emphasis on the message of unconditional love and understanding. The fact that the tree continues to give and support the boy is a true testament to her love, and therefore the aspect of the story that is multiplied simply enhances this attribution.