Quick: Blox

23 Apr

Light: Blox

23 Apr

Visible: Blox

23 Apr

Multiple: Blox

23 Apr

Exact: Blox

23 Apr

Visible: Cornell

22 Apr

Visibility, in terms of Cornell and the composition of a blox, in my mind centers around the imagination and the mind’s role in filling in the gaps of this story.  For me, the process of gathering images or icons to include in the blox for the quality of visible is simply a reflection upon what I have thought about in the process of reading The Giving Tree.

The Giving Tree is visible because of the careful craftsmanship with which Silverstein composes this story. I like to think that this story is visible through a kaleidoscope- it becomes a mixture of wonderful colors, even in its black and white illustrations, and is a constantly moving story, like that of a kaleidoscope. Also included in my blox for visibility will be a magnifying glass. Not only is a magnifying glass used to see things more closely and clearly, but I have personal memories involving magnifying glasses that relate to my childhood. I was always fascinated with them and often played with them outside trying to capture the sun and use it to further illuminate whatever was around. A picture of an eye is also appropriate. Not only for obvious reasons, but I am including it in the sense that it represents the mind’s eye- the eye with which we are allowed to see what the imagination fabricates for us. I am a visual learner and also have tendencies toward a photographic memory. Therefore, everything I see I can remember very well, and things that I do not see, I create mental images that help me to remember them. In that sense, my mind is also a sketch pad because it creates what it does not see explicitly.

All of these things come together to make a blox that is colorful and filled with things that represent images that are visible and that represent the ability to see them- visibility.

Visible: Adaptation

22 Apr

An adaptation of The Giving Tree in terms of visibility will be easy to achieve. Although there is not much to be seen on the pages of the book in terms of text or extremely detailed images, the imagination works to fill in these gaps. Seger’s recommendation is to keep the story simple when adapting, and this book is no challenge in terms of simplicity. The movement of the story arcs and specific dialogue of the characters allow for a great sense of visibility in the mind of the reader. In an adaptation, however, more background information will need to be filled in as an explicit demonstration of the beginnings of the boy and tree’s relationship. Because a book allows for the mind of the reader to wander, there is no explanation needed. However, in terms of a blox or short film, a visual foundation is required for the audience to understand the significance of their interaction.

According to Seger, the stories that are the most realistic are those that are most easily adaptable- or in this case easily visible. Because we can relate to the boy and his playful actions as a child, his experiences as a teenager, and his desires for a house and a family, we not only can relate, but can visualize the way these paths of his life would go over the course of a film. We can envision the conversations, the dates he goes on, the construction of his house and the development of his family, all because we relate as human beings. For these reasons, an adaptation would not be much of a challenge in the way of story development, it would just be a matter of translating the ideas of whoever is directing, to match and be approved by those who may also be working on this project of adaptation.